Daily Archives: March 21, 2015

New Zealand beat West Indies to set up semifinal clash with South Africa

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Martin Guptill’s highest individual World Cup knock paved the way for a convincing 143-run victory for New Zealand against the West Indies as the co-hosts set up a semifinal clash with South Africa.

Chasing a mammoth 394-run target, the West Indies were bowled out for 250 runs in 30.3 overs with Kiwi pacer Trent Boult picking up 4 wickets in Wellington on Saturday.

New Zealand dismissed West Indies dangerman Chris Gayle for 61 with pacer Adam Milne bowling the dangerous left-hander off the inside edge after a typically pugnacious 33-ball innings from the Jamaican that featured two fours and eight sixes.

Gayle’s departure left the West Indies struggling at 120/5.

Earlier, Guptill bludgeoned his way to the highest individual World Cup knock as New Zealander rode on the opener’s swashbuckling 237 to record an imposing 393/6.

Guptill scored his runs off 163 balls, becoming the first New Zealander to post a double century in ODIs and the fifth in the world. He was unbeaten when the innings ended.

As he smacked Andre Russell to get to the coveted landmark, Chris Gayle, the only other double centurion in World Cup, came and congratulated Guptill at the Westpac stadium.

Reaching his 100 off 111, the last 52 balls brought Guptill a staggering 137 runs.

He smashed 24 fours and 11 sixes after New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum opted to bat.

Such was Guptill’s onslaught that the hosts reached from 300 to 350 in just 16 balls. The batsman got to his double ton off 152 balls with the help of 21 fours and eight sixes.

Earlier luck was on Guptill’s side as Marlon Samuels couldn’t hold on to a low chance at short-leg in the third ball of the innings bowled by Jerome Taylor.

There was, however, no looking back after that reprieve as Guptill anchored the innings with the others playing around him with a mix of caution and aggression.

While skipper Brendon McCullum, the dangerman in the Kiwi line-up, perished early, Guptill held the innings together and added 62 runs for the second wicket with Kane Williamson (33).

After getting his eye in, Williamson was lured into going for a false shot by Andre Russell’s slower delivery, bringing in Taylor to the crease.

While the West Indies captain Jason Holder tried different bowling options, the two experienced Kiwi batsmen looked at ease milking runs during a third-wicket partnership that yielded the Black Caps 143 runs in 22.3 overs.

After getting to his seventh ODI century with a single to long-on, Guptill upped the ante and smashed the West Indies to all parts of the ground. He reached his ton in 111 balls.

The 28-year-old launched into Darren Sammy for a massive six to start the onslaught, collected two fours and a six off Taylor, and kept finding the ropes against the likes of Holder and Suleiman Benn to reach his 150 off 135 balls.

What set Guptill’s knock apart in the age of slam bang hitting was that he scored his runs playing orthodox cricketing shots, and that at a good rate.

Just before that, Taylor (42) was run out owing to a misunderstanding, but the batsman did not seem to mind with Guptill in such fine fettle. Taylor found the fence two times during his 61-ball knock.

Meanwhile, Guptill smashed 27 runs in the 45th over bowled by Holder, clobbering the medium pacer for three sixes and a boundary.

The first of the three maximums helped him go past Glenn Turner as the highest scorer in World Cup match by a New Zealander. Turner had scored 171 against East Africa in the inaugural edition of the tournament in 1975.

Guptill then picked up 18 off Russell to propel New Zealand to 328 for four. The last over went for 20 with Guptill hitting two more sixes and a four. Before that, Taylor seventh and the innings’ 49th over gave New Zealand 16 runs.

Of all the West Indies bowlers, Russell was the worst sufferer conceding 96 runs in 10 overs.

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Guptill hits record 237 as New Zealand post 393/6 against West Indies

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WELLINGTON: Martin Guptill on Saturday bludgeoned his way to the highest individual World Cup knock as New Zealander rode on the opener’s swashbuckling 237 to record an imposing 393 for six against West Indies in the fourth quarterfinal match of the mega event.
Scorecard

Guptill scored his runs off 163 balls, becoming the first New Zealander to post a double century in ODIs and the fifth in the world. He was unbeaten when the innings ended.

As he smacked Andre Russell to get to the coveted landmark, Chris Gayle, the only other double centurion in World Cup, came and congratulated Guptill at the Westpac stadium.

Reaching his 100 off 111, the last 52 balls brought Guptill a staggering 137 runs.

He smashed 24 fours and 11 sixes after New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum opted to bat.

Such was Guptill’s onslaught that the hosts reached from 300 to 350 in just 16 balls. The batsman got to his double ton off 152 balls with the help of 21 fours and eight sixes.

Earlier luck was on Guptill’s side as Marlon Samuels couldn’t hold on to a low chance at short-leg in the third ball of the innings bowled by Jerome Taylor.

There was, however, no looking back after that reprieve as Guptill anchored the innings with the others playing around him with a mix of caution and aggression.

While skipper Brendon McCullum, the dangerman in the Kiwi line-up, perished early, Guptill held the innings together and added 62 runs for the second wicket with Kane Williamson (33).

After getting his eye in, Williamson was lured into going for a false shot by Andre Russell’s slower delivery, bringing in Taylor to the crease.

While the West Indies captain Jason Holder tried different bowling options, the two experienced Kiwi batsmen looked at ease milking runs during a third-wicket partnership that yielded the Black Caps 143 runs in 22.3 overs.

After getting to his seventh ODI century with a single to long-on, Guptill upped the ante and smashed the West Indies to all parts of the ground. He reached his ton in 111 balls.

The 28-year-old launched into Darren Sammy for a massive six to start the onslaught, collected two fours and a six off Taylor, and kept finding the ropes against the likes of Holder and Suleiman Benn to reach his 150 off 135 balls.

What set Guptill’s knock apart in the age of slam bang hitting was that he scored his runs playing orthodox cricketing shots, and that at a good rate.

Just before that, Taylor (42) was run out owing to a misunderstanding, but the batsman did not seem to mind with Guptill in such fine fettle. Taylor found the fence two times during his 61-ball knock.

Meanwhile, Guptill smashed 27 runs in the 45th over bowled by Holder, clobbering the medium pacer for three sixes and a boundary.

The first of the three maximums helped him go past Glenn Turner as the highest scorer in World Cup match by a New Zealander. Turner had scored 171 against East Africa in the inaugural edition of the tournament in 1975.

Guptill then picked up 18 off Russell to propel New Zealand to 328 for four. The last over went for 20 with Guptill hitting two more sixes and a four. Before that, Taylor seventh and the innings’ 49th over gave New Zealand 16 runs.

Of all the West Indies bowlers, Russell was the worst sufferer conceding 96 runs in 10 overs.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 V with 7-inch display and voice-calling goes official

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“The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 is an entry-level Android KitKat-powered tablet with 8GB of internal memory”

In addition launching two new metal-clad Galaxy Tab A series Android tablets, Samsung has also unveiled an entry-level slate, the Galaxy Tab 3 V. Launched in Malaysia, it is a slightly upgraded variant of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 Neo Lite . The device comes with a SIM card slot with support for 3G networks and voice-calling.

Running Android KitKat with Samsung’s TouchWiz UI on top, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 V gets power from a 1.3GHz quad-core Spreadtrum processor. It comes with a 7-inch display, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal memory, which is further expandable via a microSD card. The device has a 2MP camera at both the rear and front panel. The slate is powered by a 3,600mAh battery, and offers Bluetooth, micro-USB, and Wi-Fi connectivity options.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 V comes in white and black hues. Targeted at first time tablet users, the slate is currently only available in Malaysia for RM 499, which is roughly around Rs 8,400 in Indian currency. It is expected to launch in more markets like India in April.

AN

Few Companies Actually Succeed at Going Global

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We all like to learn from the best. So when it comes to growth it’s tempting to take global high-performers like GE, IBM, Shell, or BMW as role models and look for opportunities outside the home markets.

The trouble is that these global role models are much easier to admire than to imitate. In an analysis of 20,000 companies in 30 countries, we found that companies selling abroad had an average Return on Assets (ROA) of minus 1% as long as five years after their move. It takes 10 years to reach a modest +1% and only 40% of companies turn in more than 3%.

A look at Devon, a mid-size U.S. oil and gas producer, illustrates why international expansion produces such low numbers for so many companies. In 1999 Devon acquired PenzEnergy and in 2000 Santa Fe Snyder. The two deals gave it access to operations in Azerbaijan, West Africa, and Brazil.

After making some initial investments in these oil fields Devon eventually realized that it lacked the scale to absorb the risks that came with them. When approvals for environmental permits were delayed in Brazil, for example, the company was forced to incur rental costs on drilling equipment that it could not deploy to alternative fields and was forced to take a capital hit that a firm its size could ill afford. In 2009, Devon therefore sold off all of its foreign assets and used the proceeds to invest heavily in booming shale development in the U.S.

Global expansion is also more complicated to manage. In the 1990s Boise Cascade, a large, vertically integrated wood-products manufacturer in the U.S., decided to expand to Brazil, where it acquired timberlands and built a new mill.

Operating in Brazil, however, turned out to be much more difficult than expected because of regulatory, political, and cultural differences. Management attention, including frequent trips to Brazil, took far more time than for similar plants at home. While Boise was able to make the business profitable after a few years, the profits were not high enough to justify the added investment needed and the disproportionate drain on top management time. In 2008 Boise threw in the towel and sold the Brazilian operation to a local paper company for $47 million.

The lesson to be drawn from these experiences is that most companies should not treat international expansion as a default growth option. Like diversification it comes with many challenges. Few companies have the size or management capabilities to make a success of going overseas and for most it may well be more profitable to look closer to home.

Look at the data. We found that companies in our database that expanded domestically typically had an average ROA of +1% after five years, rising to +2.4% after 10 years, with 53% exceeding 3%.

And companies can excel without going abroad: although the global giants like GE, IBM, Shell, and BMW are undeniably high-performers, a full third of the top 10% ROA performers in our database conduct almost no international business.

HBR

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