World’s most Expensive Desert Priced at USD 14,500

The Fortress Sri Lanka debuts world’s most expensive desert. Rocking the culinary scene with its innovative style…

Located on the southern golden coast of Sri Lanka, this 49 roomed luxury resort has carved itself on the world map by creating the most expensive dessert in the world.

The Fortress Sri Lanka debuts world’s most expensive desert.Priced at USD 14,500, ‘The Fortress Stilt Fisherman Indulgence’ is a combined effort by the resort’s culinary team to create a one of a kind dessert that is intrinsically linked with the destination, offering both long lasting memories and a keepsake of the experience. Available now on special request, the dessert’s inspiration comes from the resort’s logo of the ‘stilt fisherman’, a centuries old fishing practice that continues to this day and can still be seen along this spectacular coastline.

A combination of a gold leaf Italian kasata flavored with Baileys and served with a mango and pomegranate compote and a champagne sabayon enlighten, forms the mouthwatering base of this delicious desert, however, the finishing touch is the 80 carat aquamarine stone nestled on the handmade chocolate stilt fisherman. This one of a kind culinary delight has definitely got people around the world buzzing with awe.

Legend has it that an aquamarine has the power to calm, sooth and heal. Its blue colour is often reflective of the ocean and the life giving properties of water and has been used over the years by sailors and fishermen for protection and luck. It also has a soothing effect on relationships and is said to endow the owner with foresight, courage and happiness, the recipe for a long and happy marriage and the perfect gift for those looking to surprise their loved one.

This dessert is served at Wine³, The Fortress’ sensational glass wine cave which houses over 2,000 of the world’s finest vintages and is accompanied by handmade studio flared glass cutlery – the first glass cutlery of its kind in the world which has been exclusively designed for The Fortress by Glass Studio.DMFT

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Posted on September 19, 2007, in Sri Lanka and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. glad to be srilankan

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  2. ..is this a serving of expensive desert or edible jewelery?

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  3. I always thought that cutlery meant knives, forks and spoons..? I think what the writer means is that handmade glassware is used to serve the wines at Wine3 (“Wine Cube”)

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  4. Kind of anti-climatic as the majority of the cost is a giant aquamarine.

    It’s like “world’s most expensive champagne! crappy $5 baby-duck served in a $50,000 diamond and ruby studded glass!”

    FYI. Berryl is the mineral in question. Aquamarine is a blue variety, emerald is the green variety of berryl. Morganite is the pink variety. I can’t remember what the yellow variety is. Yay random geology.

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    • I have to agree with some of the comments about this which states that the real valuable thing on the plate is not edible.I haven’t heard about the recipe or the composition of the dessert, by the way even if it was edible will anyone buy that? I work in one of the most expensive places in the world I don’t think even we will find some one to buy just a dessert for that money.

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